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Couple engaged in sex on the air

Couple engaged in sex on the air

Couple engaged in sex on the air

Lashanda Fisher, 28, and Jonathan Hightower, 31, were arrested after getting caught having oral sex inside a Texas restaurant.  (Austin Police Department) A Texas couple were caught having oral sex in a booth at a “family-friendly” eatery -- with children nearby, court records show. Jonathan Hightower, 31, and Lashanda Fisher, 28, were arrested Sunday on public lewdness charges after allegedly being spotted by a manager at the family-operated Baby Acapulco Tex-Mex restaurant in North Austin sometime before 10:20 p.m. Saturday. Witnesses told cops the pair went at it for more than five minutes before they were stopped -- and all of the action occurred in plain view of young children. A security guard for the restaurant, which boasts a “kids eat free” deal once a week, told police the couple left the eatery after their dirty deed and went to a nearby 7-11 gas station. Police said surveillance video of the eatery backed up witness statements and helped officials identify Hightower and Fisher. Hightower and Fisher face up to a year in jail and a $4,000 fine.

Katy Perry made one lucky couple`s engagement extra special this week. The moment happened during Perry`s Witness concert on Wednesday night as the 32-year-old songstress brought the two woman up to the stage. For the big moment Perry sparkled in a silver bodysuit with voluminous sleeves and white over-the-knee boots. Katie took the mic and told the crowd: `Well, I don’t know if all of y’all have seen Becky, but she’s pretty even without any makeup on. And she’s perfect every time I look at her,`  Surprise: Katie took the mic and told the crowd: `Well, I don’t know if all of y’all have seen Becky, but she’s pretty even without any makeup on. And she’s perfect every time I look at her,` In a clip shared by Perry, the woman can be seen on one knee popping the question with the singer watching on `Becky, will you marry me?` she said. By the time Katie popped the question, Perry had crept away and then dropped to the floor with joy as the moment unfolded and the crowd cheered.

A couple caught on security camera having sex in a Domino’s in the U.K. could face jail time for their “obscene and disgusting” acts. Daniella Hirst and Craig Smith were waiting for their stuffed crust pizza at the chain in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, when they let their "exuberant spirits get the better of them," SWNS reports. North Yorkshire Police were first made aware of the footage by local media after a Domino’s staff member posted it on Twitter. At a court hearing Thursday, the 18-minute-long footage shows the couple performing various sexual acts in front of the Domino’s employees. Hirst pleaded guilty to the charge of committing an “act outraging public decency by behaving in an indecent manner.” Smith, who was absent from court, was also found guilty. In court, Hirst was heard describing her behavior as "horrendous" and she "cringed" when watching the footage during the police interview. Before the event took place in Feb. 2016, Hirst and Smith had spent the weekend drinking and celebrating Smith`s birthday. Prosecuting the case, Neil Holdsworth said, "This case is about an occasion where the two defendants engaged in sexual activity in a Domino`s pizza outlet which was open to the public, with members of staff present." Arguing their defense, Scott McLaughlin said, "This case speaks for itself. Clearly, they were in drink and let their exuberant spirits get the better of them,” SWNS reports. Both Hirst and Smith will be sentenced on October 17 at Scarborough Magistrates Court.

Supreme Court Seems Split In Case Of Baker Vs. Same-Sex Couple; Eyes Now On Kennedy Supreme Court Seems Split In Case Of Baker Vs. Same-Sex Couple; Eyes Now On Kennedy All eyes were on Justice Anthony Kennedy Tuesday at a riveting Supreme Court argument where the issue was whether a baker may refuse to create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. Kennedy was the center of attention because, with the rest of the court appearing to be evenly split, he very likely will cast the deciding vote in the case. And he is the author of every major decision favoring gay rights that the Supreme Court has ever decided. A Reagan appointee, Kennedy is at the same time a fierce defender of the First Amendment right of free speech and the free exercise of religion. But the clashes inherent in those rights appeared to prompt some conflicting questions and positions from Kennedy. The case before the court involves much more than wedding cakes, and it could have huge implications for all retailers and service providers. That`s because the baker, Jack Phillips, owner of the Denver-area Masterpiece Cakeshop, claims his First Amendment right of free speech and religion exempts him from the state`s anti-discrimination law. To Colorado, however, he is a retailer and is barred from discriminating based on race, gender, religion or sexual orientation. Tuesday`s argument opened with a series of hypotheticals posed by the court`s liberal justices. The questions were aimed at Phillips` claim that baking a cake for a same-sex wedding would unconstitutionally compel him to speak as an artist and cake creator on behalf of same-sex marriage, which he opposes. When Michelangelo is not an artist, but a baker is "At the wedding ceremony, the speech is of the people who are marrying, and perhaps the officiant," Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said. "But who else speaks?" "Who else then is an artist?" Justice Ginsburg asked. "The person who designs the wedding invitations, and the menus?" "How about the jeweler, or the hairstylist, or the makeup artist?" Justice Elena Kagan questioned. No, replied Waggoner, none of those are artists. Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, speaks outside the court. Phillips contends that his First Amendment right of free speech and religion exempts him from Colorado`s anti-discrimination law. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption Why not? asked Kagan, noting that a makeup artist has the word "artist" in her name and may be using her creativity and artistry, too. And what about an architectural design? asked Justice Samuel Alito. Waggoner answered that it would not be protected. "So in other words, Mies or Michelangelo or someone is not protected when he creates the Laurentian steps, but this cake baker is protected when he creates the cake without any message on it for a wedding? Now that — that really does baffle me, I have to say," Justice Stephen Breyer said. Jack Phillips` artistry is different, Waggoner insisted, contending at one point that a chef is not engaged in speech when she creates food for a wedding or a wedding anniversary but a baker is. "We`re asking these questions," Justice Breyer said, "because we want some kind of distinction that will not undermine every civil rights law." Those civil rights laws have long barred discrimination based on race, sex and religion. Solicitor General Noel Francisco, making his first appearance on behalf of the Trump administration and supporting the baker, agreed that the court should not allow such exceptions when discrimination is based on race. But he urged the justices to allow some narrow cases of discrimination, such as in this case, when the discrimination is based on gender, or religion, or sexual orientation. In Contentious Supreme Court Case, A Cornucopia Of Sugar-Coated Confections "The problem for you," Justice Kennedy remarked, "is that so many of these examples ... do involve speech. It means that there`s basically an ability [for businesses] to boycott gay marriages." Yes, replied Francisco. As long as the sign says the baker does not make custom-made cakes for gay weddings. "I think that`s an affront to the gay community," Kennedy said. He added a few moments later that if the Trump administration`s position were to prevail, bakers all over the country might receive messages urging them not to bake cakes for gay weddings. But when Frederick Yarger, the lawyer for the state of Colorado, went to the lectern, a clearly angered Kennedy pointed to a statement by one of the seven members of the state Civil Rights Commission who was quoted saying, "freedom of religion used to justify discrimination is a despicable piece of rhetoric." Suppose, said Kennedy, that we thought at least one member of the commission based his decision against the baker in this case on a hostility to religion. "Could your judgment then stand?" he asked. Charlie Craig, Ria Tabacco Mar of the ACLU, Deborah Munn (mother of Charlie Craig) and Dave Mullins in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Craig and Mullins are the couple refused a wedding cake by Phillips. Emily Kan/NPR hide caption Charlie Craig, Ria Tabacco Mar of the ACLU, Deborah Munn (mother of Charlie Craig) and Dave Mullins in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Craig and Mullins are the couple refused a wedding cake by Phillips. Lawyer Yarger argued that while a baker may refuse to put a message on a wedding cake if he finds it offensive, he may not refuse to sell a cake to a gay couple if he has sold the same cake to a straight couple. That, said Yarger, is the essence of discrimination based on identity, just as it would be if a baker refused to sell the same cake to an interracial couple or an interfaith couple. Justice Kennedy wasn`t buying it. "Tolerance is essential in a free society," he told the lawyer, "and tolerance is most meaningful when it`s mutual. It seems to me that the state in its position here has been neither tolerant nor respectful of Mr. Phillips` religious beliefs." Representing the same-sex couple, lawyer David Cole of the American Civil Liberties Union told the justices that there is no evidence here that the state was targeting religion. Pressed by the court`s conservatives, he reminded them of the late Justice Antonin Scalia`s opinion declaring that a broad general law regulating conduct that is neutrally enforced is constitutional even when it has an incidental effect on some people`s religious views. Otherwise, said Scalia, we would be in a world that effectively permits "every citizen to become a law unto himself." While the argument progressed inside the court, there was a festive mood outside. Supporters of both sides played music, chanted and carried signs and banners. All in polite good humor. But when the litigants emerged from the courtroom, there were tears on both sides. Art on display outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Emily Kan/NPR hide caption Art on display outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Phillips choked up as he read a statement describing the harassment and difficulties he has faced in his five-year legal battle against the state of Colorado. "Stopping the wedding art has cost us much of our business — so much so that we are struggling to make ends meet and keep the shop afloat," he said. "It`s hard to believe the government is forcing me to choose between providing for my family and my employees, and violating my relationship with God." Dave Mullins and Charlie Craig, the couple turned away by Phillips, came to the microphones, too. "We`re two regular guys," said Craig. "Dave and I do not have an agenda; we do, though, have hopes and dreams. ... We want to grow old together and most importantly we want everyone to be treated equally."

AUGUST 8--A couple is facing criminal charges after they were caught having sex in public at the Wisconsin State Fair, according to police. Desiree Anderson, 28, and Robert Beasley, 28, were arrested yesterday in connection with their X-rated tryst inside an open air coliseum on the fair grounds in West Allis, a Milwaukee suburb. Anderson and Beasley--who apparently were previously married to each other--were having sex in the stands of the coliseum, which is the site for horse and dog shows. The duo, seen in the below mug shots, were frolicking in full view of other fairgoers, at least one of whom recorded the couple in action (as seen above). Upon discovering that he was being filmed by a stranger, Beasley--who was atop Anderson with his buttocks exposed--waved at the camera and smiled. When video of the raunchy duo began circulating online, a State Fair spokesperson responded that the incident was “appalling” and “inexcusable.” Criminal charges are pending against Anderson and Beasley, who has bonded out of jail. Anderson remains locked up in lieu of $400 bond at the Milwaukee County jail. According to his Facebook page, Beasley lives in Milwaukee and works as a machine operator at a leather tannery. He also wrestles under the name “Bobby Valentino” with Wisconsin Professional Wrestling, a local promotion outfit whose talent roster includes the grapplers “Nick Douche” and “Yabo The Clown.” Anderson’s Facebook page describes her as a “black widow” and “not a punk ass bitch.”